VINTAGE 1920’S ANTIQUE LARGE STUFFED MOHAIR TEDDY BEAR 24″

20140326_452This is a wonderful vintage original 1920’s large 24″ fully jointed mohair teddy bear. He has glass eyes, he is worn and loved has bottom paw torn. 

The teddy bear is soft toy in form of a bear. Developed apparently simultaneously by toymakers Morris Michtom in the US and Richard Steiff in Germany in the early years of the 20th century, and named after President Teddy Roosevelt after one of his great hunting trips. The teddy bear became an iconic children’s toy, celebrated in story, song and film. Since the creation of the first teddy bears which sought to imitate the form of real bear cubs, “teddies” have greatly varied in form, style and material, older one straw stuffed. The older and rarer “teddies” appearing at public auctions. Teddy bears are among the most popular gifts for children and are often given to adults to signify love, congratulations or sympathy.

VINTAGE 1930’S GERMAN STEIFF TERRIER DOG TOY

20140326_445This is a wonderful vintage 1930’s German Steiff large 14″ Terrier dog.  Margarete Steiff (July 24, 1847 – May 9, 1909), was a seamstress who in 1880 founded Margarete Steiff GmbH, making toy stuffed animals.  Born in Giengen, Germany she used a wheelchair, due to polio she contracted as a baby. She started making stuffed animals as a hobby. These toys began as elephants, which were originally a design Steiff found in a magazine and originally sold as pincushions to her friends. However, children began playing with them, and in the years following she went on to design many other successful animal-themed toys for children. She designed and made most of the prototypes herself.

1960 IDEAL WIND-UP TOY ROBOT MR MACHINE

20140211_298 One of my favorite toys!  1960 Ideal Toy the Mr. Machine.   I played hours with this big guy.   Mr. Machine was a robot-like mechanical man wearing a top hat. His body has a giant windup key at the back. When the toy is wound up it walks, swinging its arms and repeatedly ringing a bell mounted on its front; and after every few steps emit a mechanical “Ah!”, as if it were speaking. The toy stood about 18 inches tall (roughly 46 cm).    The gimmick of Mr. Machine was that one could not only see all of his mechanical “innards” through his clear plastic body, but one could also take the toy apart and put it back together, over and over, like a Lego toy or a jigsaw puzzle.