1950’s GERMAN COKE COCA COLA TIN TRAY

Have a Coke & a Smile

Have a Coke & a Smile

1950’s German Coca cola tin tray. Coca Cola started distributing tin serving and change trays to soda fountains in 1897. Trays produced from that date until 1968 belong to the first, or classic, period of Coca-Cola trays. Because trays made from 1970 onward were often reissues of older trays or were made from new materials. The earliest trays often had the slogan “Delicious and Refreshing,” slogans changed over time, with phrases like “Drink Coca-Cola,” “Coke Refreshes You Best,” “Here’s a Coke for you,” and “Be Really Refreshed!” Some trays had no slogan at all, only the familiar Coca-Cola logo.

1950’s JAPAN TIN TOY FRICTION RACE CAR

It's time to play

It’s time to play

This is an awesome 1950’s Japan made tin friction toy race car. A friction car toy is a toy car that will semi wind and move with a continuing movement based on the friction applied to wheels.   It will make a noise of a motor when moving. Tinplate was used in the manufacture of toys beginning in the mid-19th century. The toys were made from thin sheets of steel plated with tin, hence the name tinplate. They were a cheap and durable substitute for wooden toys. The toys were originally assembled and painted by hand. Spring activated tin toys originated in Germany in the 1850s. In the late 1880s off set lithography was used to print designs on tinplate. After the colorful designs were printed on the metal, they were formed by dies and assembled with small tabs. The lightweight of the toys allowed them to be shipped less expensively and easier than the heavier cast iron toys. The production of tin toys was discontinued during WW2 because of the need for raw materials in the war effort. After the war, tin toys were produced in large numbers in Japan.. The idea was to give Japan all of the low profit; high labor manufacturing and the US companies could sell the imported product. It worked better than they had expected and Japan became a tin toy manufacturing force until the end of the 1950s. In the 1960s cheaper plastic and new government saftey regulations ended the reign of tin toys. China has taken over the role of the leading tin toy manufacturing

1950’s HUBLEY TOY CAR MINT IN BOX

CHRISTMAS STOCKING STUFFER

CHRISTMAS STOCKING STUFFER

This is a wonderful Hubley metal toy car mint in box never played with, box has Christmas stickers on it for a stocking. The little boy never played with this. Hubley was started in 1894 as a copny of metal manufacturing motorcycles and side cars and finally into toys . Hubley made simple diecast metal toys all the way through the 1970s.

1800 GREEN GLASS JUG BOTTLE

Wine or Whiskey?

Wine or Whiskey?

This stunning green glass jug was handmade blown in early 1800’s was made to hold wine or whiskey. The translucent green glass dates to late first or second century AD to Mid AD. There is not much difference on how they were blown and made back then to now.   It is an art and craft in hand blowing glass.

1900 NAVAJO INDIAN MADE LEATHER CLOTH DOLL

Native American

Native American

A wonderful example of early 1900’s Native American doll. It is all handmade of cloth and leather.   Many of these dolls were sold early tourist trade late 1800’s to current day.   The Native American Indians master the craft of using natural resources to provide for a source of income and trading. However, the idea of a child’s doll as a lasting keepsake is not really traditional in a lot of Indian tribes. Dolls were usually made of perishable materials like cornhusk, palmetto fiber, or bundled pine needles; even dolls that were made out of wood or leather were not often built to last the way adult crafts were. In many tribes it was considered inappropriate to discipline a very young child, so they simply weren’t given toys they weren’t allowed to chew on and throw in the river. And in some tribes, the impermanence of children’s dolls and toys was meaningful to parents– as corn dolls and other childhood things naturally fell apart with time, it showed that a girl was growing up. Even though Native American dolls were not traditionally made to last, they were often beautifully adorned with miniature doll clothing and jewelry, beadwork or painting, and animal fur or even hair from the mother’s head. Because native adornment and decorative patterns are so distinctive, handmade Indian dolls are distinctive as well, and today many people, adults and children alike, like to keep them as cultural collectibles as well as toys.

1950’s TOAD FROG TAXIDERMY COIN PURSE

Small change for the toad

Small change for the toad

This is a unique toad coin purse, it is bizarre and unique. Made in the 1950’s. There is great history to the coin purse. In the 15th century, both men and women wore purses. They were often finely embroidered or ornamented with gold. It was also customary for men to give their new brides purses embroidered with an illustration of a love story. In the 17th century, bags became more complex and elaborate. Girls were taught skills such as embroidery and needlework that could assist them in finding a husband. These skills gave rise to stitched artwork on bags. Around the year 1670, men’s breeches were made with built-in pockets, which caused them to stop carrying purses. They did however carry little netted purses in their pocket to carry money. Than came this 1950 coin purse!!! It was made as a novelty gag item.

1930’S DEPUTY SHERIFFS PROWERS COUNTY BADGE

 Looking for the Bootleggers

Looking for the Bootleggers

This is a great example of 1930’s Sheriff Deputy’s badge in Prowers County. Not many people give much thought to a police badge but did you know that these badges have a rich history dating back to medieval times or that different enforcement agencies have different badges? Since we love badges, challenge coins and medals, Fun facts about police badges. The first Police officers were Medieval Knights. Police officers wear their badge on left side of chest to protect their heart and the oath they took.   First Police in America was in Boston “Night Watch” 1635 and turned in to a modern day police department in 1835. Police dogs even wear their badges

1920’s BEADED HANDBAG PURSE

Another night with style

Another night with style

This is a wonderful 1920’s beaded ladies handbag. It’s elegance is what ladies looked for when going out making a statement. Has celluloid top case. The beads are glass. Beaded purses have been handmade and in style for well over 200+ years.  The early 1800’s, Victorian,  Edwardian, Art Nouveau and Art Deco Eras brought forth some fascinating and exciting examples from Germany, France, Italy and Czechoslovakia.  Today these works of art have become one of the hottest collectibles in the marketplace.  Eexceptional workmanship make them prey for the lover of lost art forms. Not only are these handbags not being reproduced but there are very few dedicated people willing to take on their needed repairs and tedious restorations.  Cherished by women and men alike, collectors recognize the humbling, time consuming efforts put into each and every handbag as well as their continuing increase in value, a sound indicator

1920’s DECO RED BAKELITE PURSE HANDBAG

Ready for the night

Ready for the night

This is a wonderful 1920’s bakelite ladies handbag. It’s elegance is what ladies looked for when going out making a statement.   One of the first plastics made from synthetic components, Bakelite was used for its electrical and heat-resistant properties in electrical insulators, radio and telephone casings, and such diverse products as kitchenware, jewelry, handbags, pipe stems, firearms, and children’s toys. There is a large collectors market for items made of bakelite.